Covid booster vaccine: Nine bodily reactions to the jab that protects you against Omicron

Covid booster vaccine: Nine bodily reactions to the jab that protects you against Omicron

2022-01-14

Coronavirus in numbers: UK reports further 398 deaths

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

Following two or three doses of the coronavirus vaccine, the booster jab is also likely to lead to some unwanted side effects. Are you prepared? After vaccination, there are three “common” reactions that may appear around the injection site, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): pain, redness, and swelling. Throughout the rest of the body, it’s possible to experience headache, muscle pain, chills, fever, nausea, and tiredness.

Nine bodily reactions to the Covid booster:

  1. Pain
  2. Redness
  3. Swelling
  4. Tiredness
  5. Headache
  6. Muscle pain
  7. Chills
  8. Fever
  9. Nausea.

The CDC noted: “COVID-19 vaccination will help protect people from getting COVID-19.”

Side effects are “normal” as they indicate the body is “building protection” against Omicron.

“These side effects may affect their ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days,” the CDC assured.

Not everybody will experience side effects, however, which should not be a cause for concern.

If you do not experience any side effects from the Covid vaccine, you will still be building immunity against the disease.

“Serious side effects that could cause a long-term health problem are extremely unlikely following any vaccination, including COVID-19 vaccination,” added the CDC.

From the data to date, the most common reactions after a Covid booster are: a fever, headache, and fatigue.

deficiency to anaemia, sleep apnea and an underactive thyroid.

How do I know if my fatigue is caused by a vitamin D deficiency?

Experts at WebMD said: “The most accurate way to measure how much vitamin D is in your body is the 25-hydroxy vitamin D blood test.

“A level of 20 nanograms/milliliter to 50 ng/mL is considered adequate for healthy people. A level less than 12 ng/mL indicates vitamin D deficiency.”

Blood tests can be arranged by your doctor. However, all adults in the UK should be taking vitamin D supplements during autumn and winter.

While serious side effects are “rare”, it is still worthwhile knowing what they are.

For example, anaphylaxis is a “severe type of allergic reaction” that may produce:

  • Hives
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Low blood pressure
  • Significant swelling of the tongue or lips.

Then there’s thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) that causes blood clot issues.

Myocarditis and pericarditis are inflammation of the heart muscle and its outer lining.

Another rare reaction is Guillain-Barré syndrome where the body’s immune system damages nerve cells.

As a result, muscle weakness can occur and sometimes paralysis, although it must be emphasised that this reaction is “rare”.

The CDC assured: “Serious side effects that could cause a long-term health problem are extremely unusual following any vaccination, including COVID-19 vaccination.

“The benefits of COVID-19 vaccination outweigh the known and potential risks.”

What’s the latest with Covid?

According to Government data, the number of people testing positive for Covid in one day is now decreasing.

The number of deaths within 28 days of positive Covid case, however, is still increasing.

Moreover, the number of patients admitted to hospital are still on the increase.

Source: Read Full Article